BCNRA 2015 AGM

2015September

Dear Members:

Please plan to attend the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the BC Nautical Residents Association. It is scheduled for Sunday, October 25th, 3:30 pm, at Canoe Cove Joe’s Café, located at Canoe Cove Marina, 2300 Canoe Cove Rd (near the ferry terminal) North Saanich.

A new Board of Directors (5 – 7 members) will be elected at the AGM. If you are interested in serving, please be prepared to let your name stand at the meeting. All board candidates will be asked to introduce themselves before the election. No long political speeches are required…or desired! You’ll have two minutes maximum to say your background (professional and/or personal and/or boating), your home port, and why you’re interested in running for the BCNRA Board of Directors.

If you have an item that you would like discussed at the AGM, please send it to us through the contact form by October 18, 2015, to ensure that you’ll have time on the agenda.

Please RSVP your attendance to by email. If you are unable to attend the meeting in person, please complete and return the Proxy Vote Form by October 18th.

The annual business meeting of the BCNRA will be followed by a no host dinner (menu and pricing to follow) at the cafe. As the BCNRA is not being charged for the use of this venue, we sincerely hope that all who attend our AGM will stay for dinner, spirits and dessert. There will be lots of opportunity to meet new and old friends, trade stories and
talk living aboard.

Looking forward to seeing you at the BCNRA AGM!

Donna Sassaman
Recording Secretary
BC Nautical Residents Association

2014 Member Survey Results

Last year just before our 2014 AGM we asked our members to give some feedback on how the BCNRA is doing. Here are some of the answers we got back and thank you to those who contributed!

Q: What do you believe to be the biggest challenges for marine communities in your area or on the BC coast?:    

A: As far as in my area, the shortage of live aboard spaces and misunderstanding of our community.

A: Expensive land to support water based activities.

A: Pollution. Fitting into the neighborhood and community. (being a responsible citizen)

A: There are not enough of them to live in and getting fewer.

A: NIMBYism. Somehow, nautical residents and their land-based neighbours need to come to a better understanding of one another’s needs and issues.

A: For livaboards it is sanctioned moorage and sewage collection.

A: The intent of harbour authority to cleanse our harbours and national public port system of boatdwellers

A: Finding suitable marinas to live aboard.

A: Costs for moorage including live a board fees continually increasing. It appears that less and less young people are coming into this lifestyle of living aboard/cruising as those of us who are older are moving off our boats. I’m sad to see this way of life diminish and think it is partly due to how expensive moorage has become.

Also, poorly maintained or derelict boats left at anchor or on moorings through winter weather systems and left for those of us at the marina to deal with when they become a hazard. This of course is not new.

A: Biggest challenge is how resistant the various marina’s and government are to allow live aboard status. In our area (Gibsons BC) there are some live aboards, but no new ones, and as old ones leave they aren’t being replaced by new. We’re in a phase out period. I think development is an issue. I don’t know if i have all the facts, but my perception and limited knowledge is that we are getting pressure from our marina not to live aboard as they are feeling pressure from the government

A: Increased costs and regulations for live aboard boatersmaking it more restrictive and expensive to continue the lifestyle.

A: I would say for my area Gulf Islands/Victoria – lack of sewage pump out facilities, unregulated moorings, lack of community support for marine communities, specifically in the Gulf Islands and Northern communities. I also believe there is a challenge with the image of liveaboards and the mixing up of responsible boaters and marine residents with the small number of those who choose to be irresponsible.

A: Moorage, whether at Marina or on a mooring. It must be safe secure and affordable.

A: Acceptance, expansion, growth, new communities. Changing public/marina owner/municipality outlook towards live aboard communities.

A: Lack of live aboard berthage. Too many moorings with no boats on them…privatizing of anchorages

Q: In the last few years have you noticed any positive changes in marine communities?:

A: On Salt Spring changes have been negative.

A: New positives??? Old positives remain in that there is a diverse community on the water that are bound by the realities of nature and a shared experiences related to that reality. I am not sure many if any significant positives have arisen.

A: We just moved to Westbay last year and moved aboard. This is a real jem of live a board community. We feel very blessed.

A: Not very many. NIMBYism seems rampant, e.g., Maple Bay.

There have been some positive draft changes to the bylaws in Area D of the Cowichan Valley Regional District (Cowichan Bay), and some positive interactions in Oak Bay between the BCNRA and local authorities re dinghies and anchored liveaboards.

A: Yes New Westminster is civilized I’m not under immanent threat of deportation from my home town

A: Previously at Pier 32 in Vancouver….now at Spruce Harbour (Greater Vancouver Live Aboard Co-op), so a much more secure live aboard community.

A: Our marina has been improving over the last number of years which creates a pleasant environment but again is reflected in the increase costs.

A: Not in terms of live aboards, no.

A: yes

A: I believe there has been some recognition from non-marine residents that there are responsible marine residents and that this lifestyle is more common than most think. I also like the initiative and attitude of some liveaboards who want to make a difference on the coast. I also appreciate that the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority has made some moves in the right direction in updating zoning and ensuring that marine residents legally have a place to be within the Victoria Harbour.

A: Yes. The BCNR was organized. Victoria legalized the float homes at Fishermans wharf. Live aboard boats to follow soon?

A: I’m a mover, changing locations every few seasons for the last 20 years and think it has stayed pretty much status quo. With the exception of a relatively small percentage of dock spaces, live aboards are pretty much shunned.

A: More couples, More young people, Better hydro

Q: Are there any areas where you feel the BCNRA isn’t doing enough?:

A: I think the BCNRA is doing its best.

A: I think our Association could be more effective if we had local ‘reporters’ in each marine community or area, who could keep the Directors informed on issues and positive changes in their area. These ‘reporters’ could request assistance from the BCNRA as needed, and/or mobilize local nautical residents and their supporters to work on local issues.

The Board of Directors of the BCNRA is a small group of people; the BC coast is very large. The BCNRA needs to encourage our membership to be actively involved in the Association and in their local area.

A: Our national public port system has been devolved into feudalism. Once upon a time public access was a legal right. The intent to cleanse our national public port system of boatdwellers is genocide. See definition of genocide in the Canada criminal code.

A: I’d like to see more lists of possible places to live aboard, and perhaps some way we can work as a group (lobby?) to ensure the government doesn’t phase out live aboard status. (editor’s note: We are keeping a list here!)

A: I’d like to see the organization be a bit more vocal. Perhaps work towards shedding light on the good things about marine communities rather than letting the media focus on the bad. Maybe that’s in the form of more stories, publications or short videos. To work towards developing some tools for marine residents to use against those who are trying to eliminate this way of life. Work to involve our membership on some of the projects we wish to take on (because the Directors can’t do it by themselves).

A: presenting its case to local government for # 1

A: Tough sell it seems and where to direct energy? Awesome that you are here and making a presence/effort!

A: Maybe more education directed at Marina owners and regional districts and letting people know that it isn’t cool to reserve patches of water by dropping a buoy that you only intend on using periodically

Q: What else would you say to the directors of the BCNRA?:

A: Stay with the basics. Keep harbours available, work to save anchorages, stay in the game.

A: The BCNRA has made a real difference in resolving some issues. Let’s make a concerted effort to attract new members and identify ways to keep the members involved.

A: Anchor for your rights in false creek for Canada Day

A: Continue to promote live aboard communities through out the province.

A: You’re doing great, don’t give up. Share the work with keen members!

A: Focus on one or two issues each year, define goals and complete task.

A: Just a thought. A list of friendly docks toward liveaboards. Be very cool to see the difference between Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin!

A: Well done…..

Massive Marine Garage Sale 2015

photo 2If you’re looking to gain some freeboard this year, we can help! BCNRA is seeking donations for our table at the 2015 Massive Marine Garage Sale in Victoria. If you have anything you’d like to contribute, please let us know by responding to the recent members email or sending us a message through our website. We have folks available until April 24th to receive or pick your items in the Victoria and Sidney area.

Learn more about how your donations are used here and thank you for your support!

Where and When?
Saturday, April 25, from 9:00am — 1:00pm, in it’s usual place ? the Pier A warehouse building at Ogden Point (the cruise ship terminal) in Victoria. Entrance is $5 for adults and children 12 and under are FREE. For more information visit: http://mmbc.bc.ca/massive-marine-garage-sale/

2014-2015 BCNRA Directors

Directors_editThanks to those who attended the 2014 AGM. Seven Directors were elected – Some familiar and a few new faces! The 2014-2015 BCNRA Directors (left to right): Kris Samuels – Esquimalt, Allan Crease – Salt Spring Island, Bill Sassaman – Cowichan Bay, Ken Lund – Nanaimo, Tim Finlay – Victoria and Pender Island, Rick Schnurr – North Saanich, and Randy van Eyk, Vancouver

New Marina Managment In Nanaimo

Many consider Nanaimo a great provisioning stop on their way North or South along the inside passage. Some changes may be in the air (for good or bad?) as the Nanaimo Port Authority works on signing a deal with Pacific Northwest Marina Group which would mean the private company would have a 30-year management agreement. Please see the full story in this link:

http://www.nanaimodailynews.com/news/nanaimo-region/port-authority-inks-deal-for-9-million-marina-makeover-1.257147

Pacific Northwest Marina Group
Pacific Northwest Marina Group
Pacific Northwest Marina Group

2014 Annual General Meeting

October, 2014

Dear Member:

Please plan to attend the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the BC Nautical Residents Association. It is scheduled for Sunday, November 16th, 4:00pm, at the Stonehouse Pub, located at 2215 Canoe Cove Rd, North Saanich, BC V8L 3X9. Please plan to stay for a ‘no host’ dinner after adjournment of the meeting. The food is great and the pub is a relaxing environment in which to get acquainted with your fellow nautical residents!

Please RSVP your attendance and dinner reservation by responding to our broadcast email or via our contact form.

If you are unable to attend the meeting in person, please complete and return the Proxy Vote Form by November 2nd. You can mail it to: BC Nautical Residents Association, 309 – 1521 Church Avenue, Victoria, BC  V8P 5T7, email it (scan your signed form and respond to the broadcast email), or fax it to 250-479-4192. Thank you.

A new Board of Directors (5 – 7 members) will be elected at the AGM. If you are interested in serving, please be prepared to let your name stand at the meeting. All board candidates will be asked to introduce themselves before the election. No long political speeches are required! You’ll have two minutes maximum to introduce yourself, including where you’re from, the skills and experience you would bring to the organization, and why you’re interested in serving on the BCNRA Board of Directors.

If you can’t attend the AGM, and want to run for the Board, email your introduction by November 2nd and confirm that you would be able to attend monthly directors’ meetings in person or by Skype.

If you have an item that you would like discussed at the AGM, please email it to us through our contact form by November 2nd to ensure that you’ll have time on the agenda.

Looking forward to seeing you at the BCNRA AGM!

Donna Sassaman
Recording Secretary
BC Nautical Residents Association

2014 Member Survey

Whether you can make it to the AGM or not, we’d like to hear from you! Please take the time to complete this short survey prior to the 2014 AGM. This will help the directors to continue moving forward in supporting marine communities on the BC Coast. You can either respond to this email or complete the online form.

Online Form: http://bcnr.org/current-events/2014-member-survey/

Date ________________
Name _______________

1. What do you believe to be the biggest challenges for marine communities in your area or on the BC coast?

2. In the last few years have you noticed any positive changes in marine communities?

3. Are there any areas where you feel the BCNRA isn’t doing enough?

4. Would you be willing to volunteer or fund projects for the benefit of all marine communities?

5. What else would you say to the directors of the BCNRA?

Harbour Dialogue Open House and Ideas Forum – Victoria

Rick, Tim and Kris attended the Harbour Dialogue Open House and Ideas Forum put on by the City of Victoria this past weekend. We were interested to hear the ideas and to ensure that marine communities were considered as the city works to improve the inner harbour. For more information and an opportunity to share your ideas in a survey, follow the link below.

http://www.victoria.ca/EN/main/departments/planning-development/community-planning/harbour-dialogue.html

photo 1photo 3 photo 2

Use the Correct Heater on your Boat

By: Rick Schnurr, MV Julie May, Victoria Harbour

Over the past couple of months there have been two boat fires in Puget Sound marinas. Enough is enough! These fires are a great concern to all boaters, live aboards included. One fire on one boat can and often does lead to many boats in the marina being affected. This was certainly the case last weekend in La Conner, Washington, where 15 boats were damaged in the most recent fire.

The cause of the La Conner fire is not know at this time.

But, I want to weigh in with my own prejudice about using electric heaters on boats during the winter months. There are usually two groups of boaters using electric heaters. One group are the live aboard boaters, who, by definition, are aboard their boats and thus, monitoring the heater. The second group are those boaters who do not live aboard and are not monitoring the boat on a daily basis. This is the group that concerns me the most because if a problem is developing, no one is aware of it until flames and smoke are billowing from the boat. At this point all other boats in the marina are also in danger. If there are no live aboard boaters in the marina or if they are grouped in only one area, then there is even less of a chance that someone else will notice the problem as it is developing.

Now, my own personal prejudice concerning electric heaters is directed towards the type of heater employed. I am dead set against any type of electric heater that uses a glowing hot coil and fan to disperse the heat. Often these are known as QUARTZ HEATERS and FAN HEATERS. Both of these types of heaters employ an extremely hot coil and anything at all flammable that comes in contact with this heater is going to catch fire. Here are pictures of this type of heater:

Screen shot 2014-02-23 at 10.17.57 AM

These type of heaters are often chosen because they are inexpensive and it is possible to distribute a number of them around the boat. Also, remember that these heaters often draw 1500 watts of power. If your boat is plugged into 30 amps of shore power, then each one of these will be consuming half of your shore power. Two heaters will have your shore power cord pumping at max consumption (and heat) eventually frying the cord ends (if you’re lucky). If you’re not lucky they may result in a fire on the boat.

Boats that are left unattended for long periods of time over the winter are the most susceptible to problems. But, even if you are not living aboard, there is no need to put yours and everyone’s boat at risk by using QUARTZ HEATERS. There are safer ways to keep your boat warm and dry over the winter.

On Julie May we only use OIL FILLED HEATERS for warmth and dryness during the winter months. Yes, when the temperature drops below freezing we also use our diesel heater, but only when we are on board. Oil filled heaters come in a few configurations and use between 500 watts and 1500 watts (usually with three settings, 500,1000, 1500). We use two 500 watt heaters ( fore peak & galley) and one 1500 watt heater in the salon (set to 500 or 1000 watts MAX). If we are using any other electric appliances (cooking) then the salon heater is turned off. Here are pictures of oil filled heaters: a multiple setting 1500w and a 500 or 700 watt.

Screen shot 2014-02-23 at 10.17.41 AM

These heaters have no glowing hot coils and even if they are set too close to a bulkhead they will not burn it. I think you would have to carelessly allow something like fabric to fall over the heater to cause a problem. These oil filled heaters do a good job of keeping the boat warm and dry. They are just not as quick to heat the boat up from cold as a heater with a fan in it. While a fan/ coil heater heats the space by convection, the oil filled heater works by radiating its heat to warm the hull, bulkheads and furniture of the boat. These oil filled heaters are not much more expensive than the quartz variety. A 500 or 700 watt unit can be found for around $50.00, and a 1500 watt one will be about $80.00 to $100.00.

Here is another idea that an old salt, John Grant of Quadra Island, told me about. It is so simple. All it involves is a pie plate, a porcelain light socket, a 60watt light bulb, and a clay flower pot. Set the light socket in the pie plate with bulb installed and support a clay flower pot over it, set upside down. Turn on the light and you have a simple, safe and inexpensive heater that will keep your boat dry.
Here it is:

Screen shot 2014-02-23 at 10.17.31 AM

So for your and all of your neighbour’s safety, don’t use quartz heaters. Equip your boat with oil filled heaters (or flower pot heaters).