Thieves targeting boats in Nanaimo marinas

Source: Chek News, Posted By: Skye Ryan on:
http://www.cheknews.ca/thieves-targeting-boats-nanaimo-marinas-179943/

A major rash of thefts from boats in and around Nanaimo has people on alert.

Tens of thousands of dollars worth of property has been taken in recent days and thieves appear to be organized and targeting local marinas and boat owners repeatedly.

Stepping onto her boat used to be a stress release for Meg Landry, now it’s worrying.

“It just makes you feel sick to your stomach,” she says, wondering if it has been broken into yet again. “You think about it all the time.”

The Nanaimo woman has reason to worry. Her boat’s now been broken into four times, despite it being in a locked, barbed wire fenced compound. As thieves target the Harbour city with a rash of thefts from boats in recent days that’s left owners up and down the east coast of the Island on edge.

Twenty-one boats were hit at a fishing tournament 10 days ago, and since then reports of thefts have been coming in almost everyday. Landry says its as though plates have just sailed in and set up a theft ring here. Taking anything of value from fishing rods, to blankets, radars and down riggers.

“Also they’re targeting safety equipment such as your flare guns, life jackets and if you happen to not notice that those things are missing off your boat you could end up in some real trouble,” says Landry.

Surveillance video captured a suspect in a rash of thefts from boats Monday night, including Meg Landry’s. Coming in by water then slipping away with thousands of dollars worth of other people’s property.

‘These are all hard working people that have these boats down here,” says Brian Potentier of Sea Air Seaplanes, “and even showing the footage to the owners just seeing their response, seeing their boats being boarded by this strange fellow and taking all their equipment the they’ve worked hard for. ”

Nanaimo RCMP are investigating.

“We have constant contact with the pawn shops, we’re getting feedback from citizens,” says Cst. Gary O’Brien of Nanaimo RCMP. “We’re doing what we can. We also need the boat owners to assist us reporting suspicious activity and locking up their goods. ”

Meg Landry is encouraging boaters to watch out for each other as well. Since thieves decision to target the aptly named Harbour City right now, could mean any number of them are next.

2016 Massive Marine Garage Sale

2016GarageFBBannerAs some of you may know, the BCNRA table at the Massive Marine Garage Sale has continued to be a huge success each year, raising funds and awareness for our Association! We are always pleasantly surprised by our membership’s generous donations. This year, if you have anything to contribute, please respond to our broadcast email or send us a note!

Thank you for your continued support!

Where and When?
Saturday, April 23, from 9:00am — 1:00pm, in its usual place ? the Pier A warehouse building at Ogden Point (the cruise ship terminal) in Victoria. The entrance is $5 for adults; children 12 and under are FREE. For more information visit: http://mmbc.bc.ca/massive-marine-garage-sale/

Letter to Hon. Hunter Tootoo

November 9, 2015

BC Nautical Residents Association
309 – 1521 Church Avenue Victoria BC V8P 5T7
www.bcnr.org II feedback@bcnr.org

Hon. Hunter Tootoo
Minister, Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard House of Commons
Ottawa, Ontario

Re: Derelict and Abandoned Vessels; Protection of the Rights of Liveaboard Boaters

Dear Minister Tootoo:

Congratulations on your appointment to the Fisheries, Oceans, and Canadian Coast Guard portfolio. As Canadians living on boats and floathomes, members of the BC Nautical Residents Association (BCNRA) count themselves among your constituents.

The BC Nautical Residents Association was founded in 2010 by a group of liveaboard boaters to encourage living aboard responsibly and to find solutions to issues faced by people who live on the water. The BCNR’s mission statement is to:

1. Preserve and support the tradition of living aboard one’s vessel;
2. Promote environmental awareness among liveaboards;
3. Establish effective communications and resolve issues of concern to liveaboards;
4. Serve as a voice for liveaboards regarding activities that affect BC waterways.

During the previous parliamentary session, the then-M.P. for Nanaimo, Jean Crowder, introduced a private member’s bill, C638, regarding a process to clean up derelict vessels along Canada’s coastlines. Regrettably, the Conservatives defeated the bill. While the majority of boat owners are responsible maintainers of their vessels, sometimes boats become wrecks or derelicts through accident, neglect, or abandonment. The BCNRA believes that the Coast Guard has the expertise, and should have the adequate resources, to dispose of wrecks and derelicts in an environmentally sustainable way.

Our Association supports the introduction of an annual decal program, similar to that of Washington State. In Washington, an annual decal costs approximately $28US and the proceeds go to marine enhancements, including the removal of derelict and abandoned vessels. A Canadian Coast Guard staff person once told a BCNRA director that if the Coast Guard had $2/boat/year, there would be no problem in removing wrecks. The Association encourages you as Minister to introduce legislation that will adequately fund the Canadian Coast Guard to deal with derelict and abandoned vessels.

The Association also requests that your Ministry investigate and reverse the trend by harbour authorities to deny moorage at public docks to liveaboard boaters. As Canadian citizens or permanent residents, liveaboards should have as much right to moor at public docks as commercial or recreational vessels have. However, this is not the case. In British Columbia, it seems that only the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority welcomes liveaboards, while the harbour authorities in Sidney, Cowichan Bay, Vancouver, Port Hardy, and Port Alberni, to name just a few, have eliminated liveaboards all together, or grandfathered them in while prohibiting newcomers.

Direction for the prohibition appears to come from the DFO. We refer you to http://www.pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/consultation/sch-ppb/docs/min-pv/2014-10-29-eng.pdf, page 4, item 6, which states it is the Small Craft Harbours, Pacific Regional Harbour Authority’s policy that the SCH ‘…has and continues to discourage liveaboards [my italics]…’

This policy is discriminatory. The BC Nautical Residents Association would like to see the Liberal Government take a humane, inclusive, and proactive approach to protecting the right of Canadians to live aboard their vessels at public docks as well as private marinas.

Thank you for your consideration of these two issues, Minister Tootoo. We look forward to receiving your views on funding the Canadian Coast Guard to remove derelict and abandoned vessels where necessary, and to protecting the rights of Canadians who choose to live as nautical residents.

Yours sincerely,

Donna Sassaman
Secretary
On behalf of the Board of Directors BC Nautical Residents Association feedback@bcnr.org

c.c. Conservative Fisheries Critic
Fin Donnelly, NDP Fisheries Critic
Elizabeth May, Leader, Green Party
Directors, BC Nautical Residents Association

Letter to the Editor – Re: Anchored Boats in Ladysmith Harbour

November 12, 2015

Ladysmith Chronicle
Box 400, 940 Oyster Bay Drive
Ladysmith, BC V9G 1A3

Re: Anchored Boats in Ladysmith Harbour

Dear Opinion Page Editor:

The BC Nautical Residents Association (BCNRA) was founded in 2010 by a group of liveaboard boaters to encourage living aboard responsibly and to find solutions to issues faced by people who live on the water. The BCNR’s mission statement is to:

  1. Preserve and support the tradition of living aboard one’s vessel;
  2. Promote environmental awareness among liveaboards;
  3. Establish effective communications and resolve issues of concern to liveaboards;
  4. Serve as a voice for liveaboards regarding activities that affect BC waterways.

Several of BCNRA’s members live aboard their boats in ‘Dog Patch’. Some have been there for years. They are citizens: they shop, work, volunteer, and vote in Ladysmith and the environs. Some of Ladysmith’s liveaboards at one point made a conscious decision to live a nautical lifestyle, while others may have fallen into it through any number of life’s challenges. They are like many of Ladysmith’s land-based residents – a mix of family composition, with a range of ages, economic resources, educational backgrounds, interests, political viewpoints, and hobbies. Like most Canadians, they just want to live and let live.

Some shore-side residents object to seeing boats at anchor, stating that they are ‘derelicts’ and/or not paying their fair share. Some of the boats may be unsightly, but if they are floating high on their waterlines and are being monitored by their owners, they are not derelicts. There are houses in our coastal communities that will never make it into Better Homes and Gardens but no one is demanding they be eliminated. Why should boats at anchor be banished? Buildings must conform to maintenance bylaws. Why not boats? Land-based residents must pay for services such as water, garbage, fire, and police protection. Why not set up a system for liveaboards to pay for the services they use?

Liveaboard vessels by definition are not derelicts. Derelict “… generally means vessel or cargo which has been abandoned and deserted at sea by those who were in charge of it without any hope of recovering it.” [BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations’ Technical Staff Guide on Problem Vessels] The question of liveaboards in Dog Patch should not be conflated with the issue of the Vicki Lynne.

During the last parliamentary session, the then-M.P. for Nanaimo, Jean Crowder, introduced a private member’s bill, C-638, regarding a process to clean up derelict vessels along Canada’s coastlines. Regrettably, the previous government defeated the bill. While the majority of boat owners are responsible maintainers of their vessels, sometimes boats become wrecks or derelicts through accident, neglect, or abandonment. The Coast Guard has the expertise, and should have the adequate resources, to dispose of wrecks and derelicts in an environmentally sustainable way.

Our Association supports the introduction of an annual decal program, similar to that of Washington State. In Washington, an annual decal costs approximately $28US and the proceeds go to marine enhancements, including the removal of derelict and abandoned vessels. A Canadian Coast Guard staff person once told a BCNRA director that if the Coast Guard had $2/boat/year, there would be no problem in removing wrecks.

The BCNRA encourages Canadians to write to Hunter Tootoo, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard (hunter.tootoo@parl.gc.ca), requesting that he introduce legislation to adequately fund the Canadian Coast Guard to deal with derelict and abandoned vessels.

Finally, the BC Nautical Residents Association is encouraged to learn that the municipality has struck a working group, comprising various levels of government, the local First Nations, and stakeholders, including boaters at anchor, to arrive at a mutually satisfactory solution to whatever issues have been identified.

Thank you.

Rick Schnurr, Director
Bill Sassaman, Director
BC Nautical Residents Association


Note: the published version of this letter was abbreviated due to word count constraints. It communicates the same message with less detail.

Who’s the best party for marine residents?

I realize this is a complicated question but with advanced polls starting today, I thought it would be interesting to see if there is a general consensus among liveaboards on who to vote for. Attached to this post on our website is a poll to fill out. Any discussion on our blog or Facebook to further explain your positions is welcome and note, that the BCNRA remains nonpartisan. Thanks! – Kris

In the 2015 election, which party do you feel will best address the needs of marine residents for the future?

  • Green (42%, 5 Votes)
  • NDP (33%, 4 Votes)
  • Liberal (8%, 1 Votes)
  • Other (8%, 1 Votes)
  • I don't know (8%, 1 Votes)
  • Conservative (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 11

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Anchoring Karma?

IMG_2956

Jude and Rick have owned and cruised Julie May for the past eight years. Prior to that, they lived in a float house on Quadra Island and Rick owned and sailed a Cal 25 for thirty years.

Have you ever had one of those series of related events that make you wonder if the gods are playing with you for their own amusement? You may know the type of experiences I’m referring to where something that usually never happens to you starts occurring over and over again.

Jude and I had been planning to spend an extended period of weeks going for a long cruise in Julie May, our 42′ converted trawler. Julie May is a 47 year old ex fish boat with lots of water under keel. When out cruising, we both prefer to be at anchor in some quiet beautiful bay for an evening rather than tied up to a marina dock. In all those years we have experienced very few, totally inconsequential, anchoring difficulties.

Well, this year we began our cruise around mid July, having spent the previous number of months babysitting our grandchild Cade two days a week while tied to his parents’ dock on Piers Island. Now we were underway. In the past ten days we have been severely challenged with four serious anchoring problems. After each one has been resolved, I keep saying to myself, “Glad that’s over. Now let’s get on with things.”  Famous last words. I think I will abandon that phrase. It’s seems to be mocking me.

Our first problematic anchoring experience actually occurred before our cruise even got underway. Having to anchor Julie May for the day due to an appointment in Victoria, I put the hook down off the Swartz Bay government dock in exactly the same location where I had anchored a few nights before. Planning then to spend the night with Cade and his family on Piers Island, I began to raise our good old Northhill from the 10 meters of water where she had held me the previous night. With 75 ft of chain out, the anchor came up beautifully, but, stopped the winch dead with 25 ft remaining. Try as I might, she was stuck fast. Hung up on something.

Saying a thank you to the creators of cell phones and the Internet, I was able to summon Cold Water Divers from Tsehum Harbour who arrived in 30 minutes. Two divers, a boat operator, 40 minutes and $336 later the Northill was freed from its figure 8 wrap around a cable. The divers could not see what that cable was attached to. An old mooring? Logging derbies? Piers Island power and water? Who knows. I was just glad to be free.  Said to myself, “Boy, glad that’s over. Now we can get on with things.”

A few days later after some great family time with both grandchildren, we left for Pender Island. After a pleasant couple of days anchored next to Lazy Bones II visiting Tim & Denise in Port Browning, we headed north anchoring at Kendrick Island in Gabrolia Pass. We tucked down well into the bay beyond the yacht club docks to get out of as much of the westerly wind as possible. It’s quite deep along the east side of the bay with a drying reef protecting the anchorage from the Strait of Georgia. It was pretty windy that night and Julie May moved around quite a bit, her anchor chain thumpIng and groaning most of the night. While we had anchored rather close to shore, the next morning revealed that we were uncomfortably close to that reef. So, what to do? Pull the anchor of course and head for someplace else. And up comes the chain only to stop with a clunk before all was rolled up on the winch. Looking down from the bow, I was greeted with the sight of a jumbled tangle of 3/8″ chain wrapped around the flukes of the Northill, which was hanging upside down. Damn. While Jude slowly navigated Julie May around the bay, I hung over the bow with my 8′ pike pole trying to untangle the (very heavy) mess. I was able to get all but the last wrap untangled when Jude made the wise observation that we could tie up to the (private property, no trespassing) unoccupied yacht club dock, pull the anchor up on it and finish the job. We did that and motored off to a very crowded Silva Bay where we again put the hook down in a mud and sand bottom to wait out the howling westerly wind, me thinking, “Boy, glad that’s done. Now we can get on with it.” Famous last words.

The next day the westerly winds were to die down to a reasonable 10-15 knots so we (really Rick) thought we could continue north towards our next goal, Jedediah Island. It seemed like a good idea, with area WG non operational that day, we would cut off five miles of the trip. What we encountered were 4′ swells and four hours of spray over the bow. The last hour was relatively comfortable as the swells gave way to a moderate chop. We discovered our favourite one boat anchorage, Codfish Bay, with three boats already in it. Exploring the east side of Jedediah, nothing seemed well enough protected from the continuing westerly winds. So, we moved across to Boho Bay on Lasqueti island, well protected from the westerly and a preferred anchorage for larger boats. We had anchored there before. By nightfall there were about nine boats in the bay with a 58′ classic sailboat next to us and a smaller trawler upwind. The wind was blowing enough that at 3:30am I got up to lower the hatch over our bed. Looking forward, there was that other trawler about 15′ from our bow. Obviously, her anchor was dragging. And the 58′ classic sailboat was close enough to us that I was forced to put out fenders along our starboard side. Shining a bright flashlight and tooting our horn, I was able to rouse the crew of the trawler who quickly dealt with their boat. After some deliberation and polite conversation with the captain of the sailboat, he pulled up and re anchored further away from us. Whew, I said, “Glad that’s over. Now we can get on with it.” Famous last words. I’ll never say them again!

Having gone back to sleep with the wind still westerly, we woke up at 8:00am. The wind had shifted, as predicted, to the southeast which was to blow about 10-20 knots. Time to move to a more protected location. No problem. Just pull the anchor and go. Right? We had been held well all night. Hadn’t budged. So, engage the winch. Haul in 200′ (it’s deep in Boho Bay) of 3/8 chain. Up she comes. 150′. 100′. 75′. Clunk! Winch abruptly  and prematurely stops with 50′ of 3/8 chain and a heavy Northill anchor hanging down. I look over the bow. Sorry, I really do wish I had been able to take a picture. Because there was an anchor. Not my anchor. Somebody else’s anchor (a big Danforth). And attached to it was (I measured later) 35′ of 5/16 chain and about 15′ of nylon rode. I told Jude later that it looked like week old spaghetti hanging down and wrapped around it all was, you guessed it, my wonderful 3/8″ galvanized chain. Below this mess was another 50′ of my chain and the Northill. Kinda heavy. Damn. Once again, Jude piloted Julie May at a snails pace into a 15 knot SE sea while I hung over the bow, trusty pike pole in hand and attempted to unravel this mess. Using two other lines to hold the Danforth in place and easing the tension on my anchor chain I was able to start unwrapping all that 5/16″ chain. Finally got it off and laying on deck, I now had to unwrap my chain from the Danforth.  And keep my fingers and arm out of any bite that the chain might create. Unwinding my chain, there was one final big slip and it was free of the Danforth. No fingers or arms involved. Only problem left was that my 50′ of chain and anchor was now pinching one of the lines I had holding up the Danforth. The solution was obvious, and much as I hate to sacrifice a line, I cut it. Now everything was free. Haul the Danforth on board. Use the winch to raise my chain and anchor and all is well. Again.

Boy, “Glad that’s …..”  No way. I’m not inviting any more karma by saying that again.

Ps.. I have a big Danforth anchor & 35′ of 5/16 galvanized chain for sale.

Rick Schnurr and First and best Mate, Jude Brooks
Aboard MV Julie May
July 20, 2015
Tucker Bay, Lasqueti Island

BCNRA 2015 AGM

2015September

Dear Members:

Please plan to attend the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the BC Nautical Residents Association. It is scheduled for Sunday, October 25th, 3:30 pm, at Canoe Cove Joe’s Café, located at Canoe Cove Marina, 2300 Canoe Cove Rd (near the ferry terminal) North Saanich.

A new Board of Directors (5 – 7 members) will be elected at the AGM. If you are interested in serving, please be prepared to let your name stand at the meeting. All board candidates will be asked to introduce themselves before the election. No long political speeches are required…or desired! You’ll have two minutes maximum to say your background (professional and/or personal and/or boating), your home port, and why you’re interested in running for the BCNRA Board of Directors.

If you have an item that you would like discussed at the AGM, please send it to us through the contact form by October 18, 2015, to ensure that you’ll have time on the agenda.

Please RSVP your attendance to by email. If you are unable to attend the meeting in person, please complete and return the Proxy Vote Form by October 18th.

The annual business meeting of the BCNRA will be followed by a no host dinner (menu and pricing to follow) at the cafe. As the BCNRA is not being charged for the use of this venue, we sincerely hope that all who attend our AGM will stay for dinner, spirits and dessert. There will be lots of opportunity to meet new and old friends, trade stories and
talk living aboard.

Looking forward to seeing you at the BCNRA AGM!

Donna Sassaman
Recording Secretary
BC Nautical Residents Association

2014 Member Survey Results

Last year just before our 2014 AGM we asked our members to give some feedback on how the BCNRA is doing. Here are some of the answers we got back and thank you to those who contributed!

Q: What do you believe to be the biggest challenges for marine communities in your area or on the BC coast?:    

A: As far as in my area, the shortage of live aboard spaces and misunderstanding of our community.

A: Expensive land to support water based activities.

A: Pollution. Fitting into the neighborhood and community. (being a responsible citizen)

A: There are not enough of them to live in and getting fewer.

A: NIMBYism. Somehow, nautical residents and their land-based neighbours need to come to a better understanding of one another’s needs and issues.

A: For livaboards it is sanctioned moorage and sewage collection.

A: The intent of harbour authority to cleanse our harbours and national public port system of boatdwellers

A: Finding suitable marinas to live aboard.

A: Costs for moorage including live a board fees continually increasing. It appears that less and less young people are coming into this lifestyle of living aboard/cruising as those of us who are older are moving off our boats. I’m sad to see this way of life diminish and think it is partly due to how expensive moorage has become.

Also, poorly maintained or derelict boats left at anchor or on moorings through winter weather systems and left for those of us at the marina to deal with when they become a hazard. This of course is not new.

A: Biggest challenge is how resistant the various marina’s and government are to allow live aboard status. In our area (Gibsons BC) there are some live aboards, but no new ones, and as old ones leave they aren’t being replaced by new. We’re in a phase out period. I think development is an issue. I don’t know if i have all the facts, but my perception and limited knowledge is that we are getting pressure from our marina not to live aboard as they are feeling pressure from the government

A: Increased costs and regulations for live aboard boatersmaking it more restrictive and expensive to continue the lifestyle.

A: I would say for my area Gulf Islands/Victoria – lack of sewage pump out facilities, unregulated moorings, lack of community support for marine communities, specifically in the Gulf Islands and Northern communities. I also believe there is a challenge with the image of liveaboards and the mixing up of responsible boaters and marine residents with the small number of those who choose to be irresponsible.

A: Moorage, whether at Marina or on a mooring. It must be safe secure and affordable.

A: Acceptance, expansion, growth, new communities. Changing public/marina owner/municipality outlook towards live aboard communities.

A: Lack of live aboard berthage. Too many moorings with no boats on them…privatizing of anchorages

Q: In the last few years have you noticed any positive changes in marine communities?:

A: On Salt Spring changes have been negative.

A: New positives??? Old positives remain in that there is a diverse community on the water that are bound by the realities of nature and a shared experiences related to that reality. I am not sure many if any significant positives have arisen.

A: We just moved to Westbay last year and moved aboard. This is a real jem of live a board community. We feel very blessed.

A: Not very many. NIMBYism seems rampant, e.g., Maple Bay.

There have been some positive draft changes to the bylaws in Area D of the Cowichan Valley Regional District (Cowichan Bay), and some positive interactions in Oak Bay between the BCNRA and local authorities re dinghies and anchored liveaboards.

A: Yes New Westminster is civilized I’m not under immanent threat of deportation from my home town

A: Previously at Pier 32 in Vancouver….now at Spruce Harbour (Greater Vancouver Live Aboard Co-op), so a much more secure live aboard community.

A: Our marina has been improving over the last number of years which creates a pleasant environment but again is reflected in the increase costs.

A: Not in terms of live aboards, no.

A: yes

A: I believe there has been some recognition from non-marine residents that there are responsible marine residents and that this lifestyle is more common than most think. I also like the initiative and attitude of some liveaboards who want to make a difference on the coast. I also appreciate that the Greater Victoria Harbour Authority has made some moves in the right direction in updating zoning and ensuring that marine residents legally have a place to be within the Victoria Harbour.

A: Yes. The BCNR was organized. Victoria legalized the float homes at Fishermans wharf. Live aboard boats to follow soon?

A: I’m a mover, changing locations every few seasons for the last 20 years and think it has stayed pretty much status quo. With the exception of a relatively small percentage of dock spaces, live aboards are pretty much shunned.

A: More couples, More young people, Better hydro

Q: Are there any areas where you feel the BCNRA isn’t doing enough?:

A: I think the BCNRA is doing its best.

A: I think our Association could be more effective if we had local ‘reporters’ in each marine community or area, who could keep the Directors informed on issues and positive changes in their area. These ‘reporters’ could request assistance from the BCNRA as needed, and/or mobilize local nautical residents and their supporters to work on local issues.

The Board of Directors of the BCNRA is a small group of people; the BC coast is very large. The BCNRA needs to encourage our membership to be actively involved in the Association and in their local area.

A: Our national public port system has been devolved into feudalism. Once upon a time public access was a legal right. The intent to cleanse our national public port system of boatdwellers is genocide. See definition of genocide in the Canada criminal code.

A: I’d like to see more lists of possible places to live aboard, and perhaps some way we can work as a group (lobby?) to ensure the government doesn’t phase out live aboard status. (editor’s note: We are keeping a list here!)

A: I’d like to see the organization be a bit more vocal. Perhaps work towards shedding light on the good things about marine communities rather than letting the media focus on the bad. Maybe that’s in the form of more stories, publications or short videos. To work towards developing some tools for marine residents to use against those who are trying to eliminate this way of life. Work to involve our membership on some of the projects we wish to take on (because the Directors can’t do it by themselves).

A: presenting its case to local government for # 1

A: Tough sell it seems and where to direct energy? Awesome that you are here and making a presence/effort!

A: Maybe more education directed at Marina owners and regional districts and letting people know that it isn’t cool to reserve patches of water by dropping a buoy that you only intend on using periodically

Q: What else would you say to the directors of the BCNRA?:

A: Stay with the basics. Keep harbours available, work to save anchorages, stay in the game.

A: The BCNRA has made a real difference in resolving some issues. Let’s make a concerted effort to attract new members and identify ways to keep the members involved.

A: Anchor for your rights in false creek for Canada Day

A: Continue to promote live aboard communities through out the province.

A: You’re doing great, don’t give up. Share the work with keen members!

A: Focus on one or two issues each year, define goals and complete task.

A: Just a thought. A list of friendly docks toward liveaboards. Be very cool to see the difference between Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin!

A: Well done…..

Massive Marine Garage Sale 2015

photo 2If you’re looking to gain some freeboard this year, we can help! BCNRA is seeking donations for our table at the 2015 Massive Marine Garage Sale in Victoria. If you have anything you’d like to contribute, please let us know by responding to the recent members email or sending us a message through our website. We have folks available until April 24th to receive or pick your items in the Victoria and Sidney area.

Learn more about how your donations are used here and thank you for your support!

Where and When?
Saturday, April 25, from 9:00am — 1:00pm, in it’s usual place ? the Pier A warehouse building at Ogden Point (the cruise ship terminal) in Victoria. Entrance is $5 for adults and children 12 and under are FREE. For more information visit: http://mmbc.bc.ca/massive-marine-garage-sale/

2014-2015 BCNRA Directors

Directors_editThanks to those who attended the 2014 AGM. Seven Directors were elected – Some familiar and a few new faces! The 2014-2015 BCNRA Directors (left to right): Kris Samuels – Esquimalt, Allan Crease – Salt Spring Island, Bill Sassaman – Cowichan Bay, Ken Lund – Nanaimo, Tim Finlay – Victoria and Pender Island, Rick Schnurr – North Saanich, and Randy van Eyk, Vancouver